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Climate change affecting soil's ability to absorb CO2

Credit: Reuters - 3D Animations (Next Me
Published on January 28, 2019 - Duration: 01:05s

Climate change affecting soil's ability to absorb CO2

A new research paper studied how climate change affects the capability of soil to trap carbon dioxide emissions.

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Climate change affecting soil's ability to absorb CO2

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RESTRICTIONS: Broadcast: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN Digital: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN A new research paper by Columbia University's School of Engineering studied how fluctuations in the Earth's hydrological cycle caused by climate change can affect the ability of soil to trap carbon dioxide.

Currently, the ocean and other terrestrial biospheres are absorbing roughly 50 percent of carbon dioxide emissions.

According to the paper published in the journal Nature, they analyzed data from four Earth system models to look for reductions in net biome productivity caused by changes in soil moisture.

Net biome productivity or NBP refers to the net gain or loss of carbon from a region over a period of time.

Results from the study showed that the land was only absorbing half as much carbon dioxide as it could have been due to changes in soil moisture.

If extreme weather events continue to affect the Earth's hydrological cycle, the land's ability to absorb carbon dioxide will be reduced causing even more extreme weather due to carbon dioxide overload in the atmosphere.

RUNDOWN SHOWS: 1.

Climate change disrupting Earth's hydrological cycle; percentage of CO2 absorbed by Earth 2.

Analysis of Earth models; explanation of net biome productivity 3.

Earth only absorbing half as much as it could be 4.

Extreme weather caused by rise in CO2 emissions VOICEOVER (in English): "A new research paper by Columbia University's School of Engineering studied how fluctuations in the Earth's hydrological cycle caused by climate change can affect the capability of soil to trap carbon dioxide emissions." "Currently, the ocean and other terrestrial biospheres are absorbing roughly 50 percent of carbon dioxide emissions." "According to the paper published in the journal Nature, they analyzed data from four Earth system models to look for reductions in net biome productivity caused by changes in soil moisture." "Net biome productivity or NBP refers to the net gain or loss of carbon from a region over a period of time." "Results from the study showed that the land was only absorbing half as much carbon dioxide as it could have been due to changes in soil moisture." "If extreme weather events continue to affect the Earth's hydrological cycle, the land's ability to absorb carbon dioxide will be reduced causing even more extreme weather due to carbon dioxide overload in the atmosphere." SOURCES: Nature, Columbia University, Yale University https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-018-0848-x https://engineering.columbia.edu/press-releases/climate-change-tipping-point http://climatecommunication.yale.edu/publications/climate-change-in-the-american-mind-december-2018/ *** For story suggestions please contact tips@nextanimation.com.tw For technical and editorial support, please contact: Asia: +61 2 93 73 1841 Europe: +44 20 7542 7599 Americas and Latam: +1 800 738 8377

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